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20121228
20121228
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
we are at. if you look at spending cuts first, barack obama has basically moved about $325 billion on spending and speaker boehner, according to the last real public offer, has moved about $350 billion. i think it is fair to say had both moved relatively equally. but if you turned to tax increases, obama has already moved from, again the last public real offer $355 billion while boehner's moved only $150 billion. less than half. and then finally, and i want to go to you to unpack this. the stimulus money. this is not to be forgotten. we are in a recession. and many economists say that whatever else you do with long-term entitlement reform which is real, another real thing is growing the economy. obama has moved $250 billion. the number that boehner has moved on that stimulus is zero from the last final comprehensive offer. what do you make of that pacting that we are not mere the 50-yard line anymore? >> we also add that not only has boehner month moved, he can't get his own caucus to vote on the plan he brought forward. we are not only talking about symbolic gestures here, we are
of those spending cuts, but it's not going to be that broad, sweeping plan that president obama and house speaker boehner had been initially working on. this is going to be a much more scaled back version of a bill. just to sort of get over this hump. so i think that right now all parties believe that is really the main hope for getting something done, but you're absolutely right. the same sticking points remain, and that is going to be the problem moving forward over these next 24 hours. i think the pressure point comes when the markets have already started to react and, of course, if they fail to get a deal done by that all-important january 1st deadline, really everyone is going to be blamed for it. of course, the polls show that republicans will be blamed the most, but ultimately president obama will have to share some of that blame as well. so i think that right now that pressure point is one of the motivating factors in getting something done. >> kristin, stay with us. i just want to bring in joy reid from the grio and robert costa from "national review." we have just a brief moment
, republicans say the problem is about spending and democrats say it is all about lack of revenue, how -- how does -- is that bridged in this year? can it be bridged? >> yes, it can. both president obama and speaker boehner have already begun to do a principle compromise. speaker boehner said i'm ready to raise taxes on those over a million dollars. president obama said i'm ready to have a new type of chain to consumer price index which -- impacts entitlement reform. the bipartisan national debt commission, simpson-bowles commission, said for every dollar of spending reduction, including the entitlement reform we immediate to have $1 in tax revenue. that's the principle compromise we have to have. so they are not far off. what we have to have is very simple. $4 trillion in debt reduction by this one-third, two-third division. because that gives us a sustainable debt to gdp ratio so the economy can go booming again. so i believe those two men have the economies of our nation best at heart and have to come a little closer and a little $500 billion sounds like a lot. $2.5 trillion. we have to do
increased his offer on taxes by about 150 billion, dropped his spending cuts by 330 billion, and has never offered significant stimulus or a major concession on the debt ceiling. so in every category since obama won the election he has moved further toward boehner than boehner toward him. yet it's boehner who walked away from the talks with his plan b, who failed to pass it and said it's the senate's problem now. democrats won more votes at presidential level, senate level and house level. boehner is speaker today because of the way the districts are drawn. but his arguments did not win. and yet he's not really moved. i don't think you can look at the last three years and sate white house has not tried to come together with republicans. i also don't think you can look at the last three years and say the republicans have tried to come together with the white house. and so here is what is supposed to happen. the american people who overwhelmingly say they want compromise, who say they want a plan similar to what the house is offering, a plan that raises taxes on the rich and cuts spending, t
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)